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Bret H. Goodpaster, PhD

Bret H. Goodpaster, PhD

Scientific Director at the Translational Research Institute

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Goodpaster

Overview

Bret Goodpaster, Ph.D. investigates the pathophysiology of human aging, obesity, insulin resistance, and diabetes, and the biological mechanisms underlying the health benefits of exercise.

Dr. Goodpaster has received a number of awards and honors for his work, including the Nathan Shock Award from the National Institute of Aging in 2008. He is particularly well known for “the athlete’s paradox” which has shifted the paradigm in type 2 diabetes research to investigate, how and why does fat accumulation in muscle cause insulin resistance in some subjects but not others? Which are the good fats and which are the bad fats?

Dr. Goodpaster has published >250 peer-reviewed papers, review articles and book chapters, has served on several Editorial Boards, and is currently an Associate Editor for Diabetologia. He has served on grant review panels for the NIH and the American Diabetes Association.

Dr. Goodpaster obtained a B.S. in Biology from Purdue, and after completing a Pre-doctoral Fellowship at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, received his Ph.D. in Human Bioenergetics from Ball State University. Prior to coming to the AdventHealth TRI-MD, he was Professor of Medicine and UPMC Chair for Diabetes and Metabolism Research at the University of Pittsburgh.

Articles

Exerkines in health, resilience and disease

NATURE REVIEWS ENDOCRINOLOGY

2022

Skeletal muscle transcriptome response to a bout of endurance exercise in physically active and sedentary older adults

AMERICAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY-ENDOCRINOLOGY AND METABOLISM

2022

State of Knowledge on Molecular Adaptations to Exercise in Humans: Historical Perspectives and Future Directions.

Comprehensive Physiology

2022

A Novel Endocrine Role for the BAT-Released Lipokine 12,13-diHOME to Mediate Cardiac Function

CIRCULATION

2021

Twenty-four hour assessments of substrate oxidation reveal differences in metabolic flexibility in type 2 diabetes that are improved with aerobic training

DIABETOLOGIA

2021

Effect of Bimagrumab vs Placebo on Body Fat Mass Among Adults With Type 2 Diabetes and Obesity A Phase 2 Randomized Clinical Trial

JAMA NETWORK OPEN

2021

The Metabolic Significance of Intermuscular Adipose Tissue: Is IMAT a Friend or a Foe to Metabolic Health?

DIABETES

2021

Weight Loss and Exercise Differentially Affect Insulin Sensitivity, Body Composition, Cardiorespiratory Fitness, and Muscle Strength in Older Adults With Obesity: A Randomized Controlled Trial

JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY SERIES A-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND MEDICAL SCIENCES

2021

Estimating cardiorespiratory fitness in older adults using a usual-paced 400-m long-distance corridor walk

JOURNAL OF THE AMERICAN GERIATRICS SOCIETY

2021

The Relationship Between Intermuscular Fat and Physical Performance Is Moderated by Muscle Area in Older Adults

JOURNALS OF GERONTOLOGY SERIES A-BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES AND MEDICAL SCIENCES

2021

Education & Training

Education

Ball State University, Muncie, IN

Fellowship

University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA; Maastricht University in the Netherlands,

Associated Clinical Trials

NCT02333331

INVESTIGAIT: A 28 week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-part, multi-center, parallel group dose range finding study to assess the effect of monthly doses of bimagrumab 70, 210, and 700 mg on skeletal muscle strength and function in older adults with sarcopenia

Icon for trial | INVESTIGAIT: A 28 week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, two-part, multi-center, parallel group dose range finding study to assess the effect of monthly doses of bimagrumab 70, 210, and 700 mg on skeletal muscle strength and function in older

This clinical research study is being conducted to find out if the drug bimagrumab BYM338 is safe and has beneficial effects in people who have a lower than normal amount of muscle for their age and have difficulty walking or c ...